Now that baby Zoe is a full-fledged mobile toddler, everyone can sit back and heave a big sigh of AAAAACCCH! The indefatigable MacPhersons are bringing up baby in a wild-eyed, yet true to life.

  Darryl and Wanda, a typical stretched-to-the-limit couple, struggled with the demands and joys of first-time parenthood in classics such as Guess Who Didn't Take a Nap? and I Thought Labor Ended When the Baby Was Born. The MacPhersons found parenthood more rewarding and frustrating than they ever expected. Through it all they adapted to this new addition to their lives with aplomb and severe exhaustion.

We Are Experiencing Parental Difficulties...Please Stand By is a Baby Blues collection from creators Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott. In the pair's lovingly realistic way, the book captures the continuing challenges Darryl and Wanda face as Zoe begins to walk, talk, and take over the remote control. It's a natural growing-up progression that Baby Blues fans have watched with rapt interest.

  Mothers love the strip because they can relate to Wanda's continued surprise at how her days have changed, from career woman to Mom, especially as she faces the prospects of adding another bundle of joy to the MacPhersons' already busy household. Dads laugh knowingly as Darryl tries to help out and hold down a demanding job. Everyone cherishes the little Zoe for making childhood antics (even the obnoxious ones) so adorable.

  Artist Kirkman and writer Scott obviously know about parenting—you can see it in every strip they produce. In this book, they provide another delicious view of life's most precious mixed blessing.

We Are Experiencing Parental Difficulties...Please Stand By

By Jerry Scott

$18.99

  "Anyone with children, or anyone who even likes being around children, will find something to laugh about in Baby Blues." —Blade Citizen, Oceanside, CA

  Who can resist adorably wide-eyed Zoe MacPherson? Certainly not her parents, Wanda and Darryl, a mid-thirties career couple who've become mommy and daddy. But, like the millions of parents who flock to this engaging comic strip, the MacPhersons also find parenthood more rewarding—and frustrating—than they'd expected. Each day of this incisive and entertaining comic series, millions empathize with them as they face the joys and demands of parenting.

I Thought Labor Ended When the Baby Was Born is a heartwarming collection from Baby Blues creators Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott. Developed in 1990 after Kirkman became a neophyte dad, Baby Blues appeals to anyone who's witnessed the eye-opening experiences only a baby can bring. Moms, for example, relate to Wanda, a former midlevel career woman who now stays home full-time to care for the mostly adorable Zoe. Dads connect with rattled-but-determined Darryl, as he still staggers off to an office each day despite mind-boggling changes life has wrought at home. Together, Mom and Dad juggle and struggle to decipher their new relationship, wondering where romance fits in, whether they're "parentnoid," and how they're affecting their daughter.

  Artist Rick Kirkman and writer Jerry Scott know about parenting and provide a hilarious, yet true-to-life, view of this mixed blessing.

I Thought Labor Ended When the Baby Was Born

By Jerry Scott

$18.99

  "My job isn't to revolutionize anything. My job is to give women a sense of relief, to acknowledge what they're struggling with." —Cathy Guisewite

  Like women around the globe, Cathy has been constantly puzzled by her romantic relationships. From Irving to Simon to Alex, the men in Cathy's life have provided a never-ending source of confusion and amusement ever since the strip began in 1976. "If men's hair falls out," our weary heroine laments, "it's because there's nothing in there for it to hold onto."

 It's no wonder, then, that cartoonist Cathy Guisewite's Cathy collection should be called Understanding the "Why" Chromosome. In this hilarious book, Cathy outdoes herself in witty revelations about men, food, Mom, and career: Cathy's four basic guilt groups. Cathy epitomizes the highs and lows felt by distaff women throughout the world. 

In Understanding the "Why" Chromosome, Cathy's found a new challenge: a boyfriend who's a decade younger than she. Fitness fanatic Alex, who's sensitive and not particularly ambitious, introduces Cathy to an entirely new relationship angst, then introduces her to his hip, young mother. Cathy's baffled by the age difference, but is just as stumped when he proposes. "What's wrong with our relationship the way it is now? "she wails when Alex finally pops the question.

  Throughout her trials and tribulations, Cathy's friends keep her sane. There's happily married Charlene, the office loudspeaker; exhausted Andrea, mother of Zenith and Gus; her well-meaning mom and dad; Cathy's unrealistic boss, Mr. Pinkley; and bouncy little Electra, Cathy's canine alter ego. Her frequent and frustrating shopping excursions also give rise to an enormous wave of female recognition "Skip the clothes and just shove a Stairmaster through the curtain," Cathy deadpans.

  Cathy Guisewite is an enormously talented cartoonist who has won numerous awards for her strip and animated television shows. Her countless fans trust Cathy to constantly express the right blend of humor and observation almost as if she had x-ray vision into the human condition.

Understanding the "Why" Chromosome

By Cathy Guisewite

$24.99