Humor for the Holidays from GoComics.com

Enamel Pins Calendars Comic Art Prints Books – Comics Collections

Detailed information on this link about Calvin and Hobbes prints.

Additional comics available as prints. Go to Gocomics.com, select a comic and click on “buy a print of this comic.”

Please allow 3-4 weeks for framed prints!

Promotional discounts do not apply for The Far Side® comic art prints.

Enamel Pins

Calendars

Celebrating an exhibit of ten years of Sunday comics featuring the beloved boy and his tiger, Calvin and Hobbes: Sunday Pages 1985-1995 is sure to bring back memories. New York Times best-seller! Everyone misses Calvin and Hobbes. It reinvented the newspaper comic strip at a time when many had all but buried the funnies as a vehicle for fresh, creative work. Then Bill Watterson came along and reminded a new generation of what older readers and comic strip aficionados knew: A well-written and beautifully drawn strip is an intricate, powerful form of communication. And with Calvin and Hobbes, we had fun—just like readers of Krazy Kat and Pogo did. Opening the newspaper each day was an adventure. The heights of Watterson's creative imagination took us places we had never been. We miss that. This book was published in conjunction with the first exhibition of original Calvin and Hobbes Sunday pages at The Ohio State University Cartoon Research Library. Although the work was created for reproduction, not for gallery display, was a pleasure to see the cartoonist's carefully placed lines and exquisite brush strokes. In an attempt to share this experience with those who were unable to visit the exhibition, all of the original Sunday pages displayed are reproduced in color in this book so that every detail, such as sketch lines, corrections, and registration marks, are visible. On the opposite page the same comic strip is printed in full color. Because Watterson was unusually intentional and creative in his use of color, this juxtaposition provides Calvin and Hobbes readers the opportunity to consider the impact of color on its narrative and content. When I first contacted Bill Watterson about the possibility of exhibiting his original work, I used the term "retrospective." He replied that we might be able to do an exhibit, but that calling it a retrospective made him uncomfortable. He felt that a longer time was needed to put Calvin and Hobbes in the historical perspective implied by that term. Nonetheless, this show is a "look back" at the comic strip as we revisit favorites that we remember. Calvin and Hobbes: Sunday Pages 1985-1995 is particularly interesting because each work that is included was selected by Bill Watterson. His comments about the thirty-six Sunday pages he chose are part of this volume. In addition, he reflects on Calvin and Hobbes from the perspective of six years, and his essay provides insights into his life as a syndicated cartoonist. Reprint books of Calvin and Hobbes are nice to have, but the opportunity to see the original work and read Bill Watterson's thoughts about it is a privilege. He generously shared not only the art, but also his time and his thoughts. When I first reviewed the works included in the exhibit, I knew that everyone who visited it would begin with laughter and end with tears. On behalf of all who enjoyed Calvin and Hobbes, thank you, Bill Watterson. --Lucy Shelton Caswell, Professor and Curator The Ohio State University Cartoon Research Library, June 2001  

Calvin and Hobbes: Sunday Pages 1985-1995

$16.99

  Now that baby Zoe is a full-fledged mobile toddler, everyone can sit back and heave a big sigh of AAAAACCCH! The indefatigable MacPhersons are bringing up baby in a wild-eyed, yet true to life.

  Darryl and Wanda, a typical stretched-to-the-limit couple, struggled with the demands and joys of first-time parenthood in classics such as Guess Who Didn't Take a Nap? and I Thought Labor Ended When the Baby Was Born. The MacPhersons found parenthood more rewarding and frustrating than they ever expected. Through it all they adapted to this new addition to their lives with aplomb and severe exhaustion.

We Are Experiencing Parental Difficulties...Please Stand By is a Baby Blues collection from creators Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott. In the pair's lovingly realistic way, the book captures the continuing challenges Darryl and Wanda face as Zoe begins to walk, talk, and take over the remote control. It's a natural growing-up progression that Baby Blues fans have watched with rapt interest.

  Mothers love the strip because they can relate to Wanda's continued surprise at how her days have changed, from career woman to Mom, especially as she faces the prospects of adding another bundle of joy to the MacPhersons' already busy household. Dads laugh knowingly as Darryl tries to help out and hold down a demanding job. Everyone cherishes the little Zoe for making childhood antics (even the obnoxious ones) so adorable.

  Artist Kirkman and writer Scott obviously know about parenting—you can see it in every strip they produce. In this book, they provide another delicious view of life's most precious mixed blessing.

We Are Experiencing Parental Difficulties...Please Stand By

$18.99

  "Anyone with children, or anyone who even likes being around children, will find something to laugh about in Baby Blues." —Blade Citizen, Oceanside, CA

  Who can resist adorably wide-eyed Zoe MacPherson? Certainly not her parents, Wanda and Darryl, a mid-thirties career couple who've become mommy and daddy. But, like the millions of parents who flock to this engaging comic strip, the MacPhersons also find parenthood more rewarding—and frustrating—than they'd expected. Each day of this incisive and entertaining comic series, millions empathize with them as they face the joys and demands of parenting.

I Thought Labor Ended When the Baby Was Born is a heartwarming collection from Baby Blues creators Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott. Developed in 1990 after Kirkman became a neophyte dad, Baby Blues appeals to anyone who's witnessed the eye-opening experiences only a baby can bring. Moms, for example, relate to Wanda, a former midlevel career woman who now stays home full-time to care for the mostly adorable Zoe. Dads connect with rattled-but-determined Darryl, as he still staggers off to an office each day despite mind-boggling changes life has wrought at home. Together, Mom and Dad juggle and struggle to decipher their new relationship, wondering where romance fits in, whether they're "parentnoid," and how they're affecting their daughter.

  Artist Rick Kirkman and writer Jerry Scott know about parenting and provide a hilarious, yet true-to-life, view of this mixed blessing.

I Thought Labor Ended When the Baby Was Born

$18.99

  "Crankshaft has touched on a raft of senior concerns with humor and often poignancy, including illness, mortality, making out a will, literacy, physical deterioration, vulnerability, security, and, recently, muggings and Alzheimer's disease." —The Telegraph, Alton, Illinois

  Cranky Ed Crankshaft is at it again, gunning his school bus so he can outdistance the little Johnson girl, backing over the Keestermans' mailbox, and holding up a record-breaking line of cars. It's just another day for the sixty-something curmudgeon who's earned a soft spot in the hearts of millions of readers.

  Originally spun off from the popular Funky Winkerbean strip, Crankshaft is an enormously popular character in his own right. Writer Tom Batiuk and artist Chuck Ayers combine their talent and insights into a strip that deals with aging in a heartfelt and funny way. "After sixty, it's just patch, patch, patch," says Crankshaft as he waits at the doctor's office.

  In this Crankshaft book, I've Still Got It! , readers can follow their beloved grandfather figure as he struggles with new challenges, from a friend with Alzheimer's disease to another friend who's been mugged. Along the way, Crankshaft continues his quest to finally read all the Popular Mechanics magazines daughter Pam has given him over the years.

  Although readers love Crankshaft because the strip makes them laugh, they also cherish the panel's honesty about issues faced by people of all ages, from literacy to illness to crime. They also appreciate the real feelings that linger just below the surface between Crankshaft and his housemates—daughter Pam, son-in-law Jeff, and their kids Max and Mindy, his stray cat, Pickles, and his girlfriend, Grace.

I've Still Got It!

$18.99

Not every kid skips a rock across a pond and winds up with a unicorn best friend, right? The popular friendship of Phoebe and Her Unicorn is back for a third collection of adventures so heavenly they had to be shared.School’s out! That means no more teachers, no more books, and lots of time to compliment Marigold Heavenly Nostrils on her good looks. In this third volume, Phoebe and her obligational best friend, Marigold, learn that summer still has plenty of surprises for the both of them. All of our old friends are back—Phoebe’s part-time “frenemy” Dakota, upon whom Marigold has bestowed sentient hair, Phoebe’s goofy parents, and even Lord Splendid Humility (but please, ignore his magnificence if you can)! Have fun as Phoebe and Marigold continue the “Phoebegold Detective Agency,” spend a week at Wolfgang Music Camp, and find themselves in more misadventures, thanks to Marigold’s enchanted sparkles! Along the way, Phoebe makes some new friends, such as Sue—her unique clarinet-playing bunkmate, Florence Unfortunate Nostrils, Marigold’s estranged sister, and Camp Wolfgang’s lake monster who enjoys tacos and Wi-Fi. When school resumes, read along as Phoebe enjoys (or suffers from) a brief case of popularity, mentally catalogs her grievances against dodge ball, and, with Marigold’s help, rescues Dakota and her hair from the queen of the goblins. Through these wacky adventures, Phoebe and Marigold learn that their friendship is the second most magical thing of all, after Marigold’s beauty, of course. Includes an introduction by Cory Doctorow and his daughter Poesy!

Unicorn vs. Goblins (Phoebe and Her Unicorn Series Book 3)

$9.99

  "My job isn't to revolutionize anything. My job is to give women a sense of relief, to acknowledge what they're struggling with." —Cathy Guisewite

  Like women around the globe, Cathy has been constantly puzzled by her romantic relationships. From Irving to Simon to Alex, the men in Cathy's life have provided a never-ending source of confusion and amusement ever since the strip began in 1976. "If men's hair falls out," our weary heroine laments, "it's because there's nothing in there for it to hold onto."

 It's no wonder, then, that cartoonist Cathy Guisewite's Cathy collection should be called Understanding the "Why" Chromosome. In this hilarious book, Cathy outdoes herself in witty revelations about men, food, Mom, and career: Cathy's four basic guilt groups. Cathy epitomizes the highs and lows felt by distaff women throughout the world. 

In Understanding the "Why" Chromosome, Cathy's found a new challenge: a boyfriend who's a decade younger than she. Fitness fanatic Alex, who's sensitive and not particularly ambitious, introduces Cathy to an entirely new relationship angst, then introduces her to his hip, young mother. Cathy's baffled by the age difference, but is just as stumped when he proposes. "What's wrong with our relationship the way it is now? "she wails when Alex finally pops the question.

  Throughout her trials and tribulations, Cathy's friends keep her sane. There's happily married Charlene, the office loudspeaker; exhausted Andrea, mother of Zenith and Gus; her well-meaning mom and dad; Cathy's unrealistic boss, Mr. Pinkley; and bouncy little Electra, Cathy's canine alter ego. Her frequent and frustrating shopping excursions also give rise to an enormous wave of female recognition "Skip the clothes and just shove a Stairmaster through the curtain," Cathy deadpans.

  Cathy Guisewite is an enormously talented cartoonist who has won numerous awards for her strip and animated television shows. Her countless fans trust Cathy to constantly express the right blend of humor and observation almost as if she had x-ray vision into the human condition.

Understanding the "Why" Chromosome

$24.99

 The popularity of Sherman's Lagoon continues to swell like the perfect wave. The strip's rather slow namesake shark is back with more urbane wit and capricious creatures in his famous lagoon. While the imagery and setting appeal to a younger generation, Sherman and his pals' clever dialogue and outlandish hang-ups appeal to their parents and grandparents as well. Sherman the dim-witted shark and his cast of characters in Sherman's Lagoon provide enough laughs for a barrel of monkeys, not that they've ever seen any. The Lagoonies, as they're known to regular comic strip readers, are a motley crew—mostly of sea life—known for their acerbic humor. There's Megan, Sherman's wife (a soft-touch despite the tough exterior). Fillmore the sea turtle makes up for Sherman's lack of intellect. Hawthorne the hermit crab resides in a beer can and is always in a "crabby" mood. Ernest the fish is a computer whiz, and Thornton the polar bear stumbled upon the island while floating by on an iceberg. Captain Quigley is the only human (or "beach ape") who resides in Sherman's Lagoon. He lost his leg to Sherman and is now out for revenge, but never quite gets close enough. To round out the cast there's Bob the bottom dweller. Enough said. 

  Readers love Sherman and his friends for their hilarious reflections of human behavior as seen through a seawater lens. Jim balances the lighthearted antics of this quirky group by promoting the importance of marine conservation. Sherman's Lagoon is quite a catch!

Sherman's Lagoon has been in syndication since 1991, and boasts a circulation of more than 200 daily newspapers on five continents.

A Day at the Beach

$18.99

  Everyone can relate to having a family member with an unusual hobby or habit. The Fox clan is no different. The youngest Fox is Jason, whose best friend is an iguana named Quincy. His sister, Paige, is a shopaholic. The oldest Fox sibling is Peter, whose stomach is a bottomless pit. But perhaps the most unusual of all is level-headed mom and official family mediator, Andy, who is working through her obsession with the movie Titanic. A slave to her emotions, she is brought to tears at a mere hint of the soundtrack and attends multiple movie screenings each day. This leaves well-meaning husband, Roger, struggling to live up to her new romantic expectations. All of this is par for the course in the hilarious but hectic Fox household.

  What makes the Fox clan so entertaining? They're just like us—only funnier—with no sappy sentimentality. Readers can't help but recognize a little bit of themselves in this family strip with its good-hearted, if not eccentric, characters. The Foxes deal with everything from sibling rivalry to marital disagreements over golfing habits to sharing time on the computer, always making us laugh in the process.

FoxTrot has amassed a colossal audience of fans of all ages who eagerly turn to this hilarious strip, whether in newspapers or on the Web. New fans and loyal readers alike will enjoy I'm Flying, Jack . . . I Mean, Roger, a FoxTrot collection. Together, the Fox family provides a witty window on the realities of home life today.

I'm Flying, Jack . . . I Mean, Roger

$18.99

  "He does wonderful work. A strip needs good characters—and that's what Jump Start has."—Charles Schulz, creator of Peanuts

  Joe and Marcy Cobb are the quintessential young married couple complete with a baby, two busy careers, and eccentric parents. An eminently likable pair, Joe and Marcy juggle their relationship, their jobs—he's a police officer, she's a nurse—and raising their daughter, Sunny. Robb Armstrong's characters are so popular that many readers of Jump Start tell him that they identify with the Cobbs.

  In fact, Jump Start features issues familiar to readers of all colors. From buying a home to volunteer work to handling the demands of parents and baby, Joe and Marcy manage life's challenges with aplomb. "Don't say that word, Sunny! " Joe intones, correcting their daughter's newly discovered use of foul language. "Bad, bad, bad, bad," corrects Marcy in agreement. In the next frame, however, Sunny's trash-talking up a storm in church. "Next time we won't react so strongly," Joe says, embarrassed. "It's too late for next time," says Marcy, cringing in the pew.

  Still, Armstrong approaches many African-American-specific issues and does so in a decidedly humorous way, and he bases the strip on his own life. While discussing a movie they've heard everyone likes, Marcy tells Joe, "It's a shoo-in to get overlooked for an Oscar! " To which Joe responds, "That good, huh?"

  Robb Armstrong offers a unique perspective that strikes a chord with audiences hungry for a positive, authentic portrayal of middle-class African-Americans. Jump Start's humor crosses all lines because it's just that: appealing, realistic, and downright funny!

Jump Start

$18.99

  "I love this cartoon Mutts! "—Brooke Shields to Jay Leno on The Tonight Show

  "People who view pets as family members will rejoice in this collection."—The Baton Rouge Sunday Advocate about Cats and Dogs: Mutts II

  Conventional pet wisdom says that there are cat lovers and there are dog lovers—and never the two shall meet. But if there's one thing the two sides do agree on, it's that they love Patrick McDonnell's charming strip, Mutts.

Mutts has won the devotion of animal lovers and comics readers across the land. Fans love the charming humor the talented McDonnell provides, as well as his one-of-a-kind artistic style that stands apart on the funny pages. Yesh! features Earl the dog, his pal Mooch the cat, and the plethora of other lovable animal regulars who pop in and out of their lives.

  Few people could conceive what animals are truly thinking until McDonnell gave us the antics and adventures of Earl and Mooch. In one series of strips, Earl reveals what pets think when their owners are late arriving home: "I must ration my dinner...who knows how long it will need to last?...The day?...The week?...The next two minutes?" His buddy Mooch declares after becoming stranded on top of a tree: "I need to reassess my goals."

  The delightful personalities of McDonnell's animal stars have won the hearts and acclaim of readers the world over. Veteran cartoonist Charles Schulz called Mutts one of the best strips ever. The strip earned the National Cartoonists Society's Comic Strip of the Year Award in 1996. In 1998, McDonnell captured the Swedish Academy of Comic Art's Award for Best International Comic Strip Artist. Yesh! celebrates the subtle humor and unparalleled style of a strip that hearkens back to the classic strips of yesteryear.

Yesh!

$18.99

  "These are wicked little guys who'll pick your pocket as they steal your heart."—Ted Koppel, host of ABC's Nightline

  Suburbanites treasure their sameness, safety, and security, little knowing what lurks just Over the Hedge. There, in a strikingly successful comic strip created by writer Michael Fry and illustrator T Lewis, reside the only slightly displaced original inhabitants of the land: R.J., an irascible raccoon, and his sidekick turtle, Verne.

  Verne and R.J. have found little trouble adapting to the ways of their human neighbors. In fact, the relationship works out just perfectly when it comes to borrowing their hot tubs, setting the table with gourmet leftovers, or relaxing on their lawn furniture. It's not that the dynamic duo don't want to stick up for sovereign rights to their turf. It's just that barbecue feasts, television, and even computers keep luring them closer to the enemy camp.

  Now in Over the Hedge 2, Fry and Lewis present their second tour de farce. They've got RJ arguing with one of his woodland neighbors, "This 'angry white mole' thing is so early eighties." There's Verne breaking the Internet by e-mailing seven million copies of Spam and potato chip pie recipe. And also, both of the "boyz in the wood" taking off in their human-neighbor Nate's Harley with the help of training wheels and a nine-iron pedal extender.

  Through it all, Fry, who also produces the nationally syndicated strip Committed, sustains a wickedly funny commentary on the joys of suburban living, while Lewis, a successful illustrator of fourteen children's books, keeps the masked wonder and his shell-shacked companion fresh from frame to frame.

Over the Hedge 2 is sure to appeal to animal lovers, suburbanites, and anyone who can laugh at the human condition, as seen through the eyes of two nearly-human opportunists.

Over the Hedge 2

$18.99

Why Grizzly Bears Should Wear Underpants is the second variety comic collection and fourth book from the comedic mastermind behind TheOatmeal.com, Matthew Inman. Classics from the website, including “Dear Sriracha Rooster Sauce,” “What It Means When You Say Literally,” and “What We Should Have Been Taught in Our Senior Year of High School,” are featured alongside never-before-seen works of epic hilarity that will delight veteran and newbie Oatmeal fans alike.Matthew Inman’s first collection of The Oatmeal.com spent six weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and sold 200,000 copies. This pivotal and influential comic collection titled 5 Very Good Reasons to Punch a Dolphin in the Mouth introduced Samurai sword-wielding kittens and informed us on how to tell if a velociraptor is having pre-marital sex. Matthew's cat-themed collection How to Tell If Your Cat Is Plotting to Kill You is a #1 New York Times bestseller with more than half a million copies in print. Now with Why Grizzly Bears Should Wear Underpants, Inman offers a delicious, tantalizing follow-up featuring all new material that has been posted on the site since the publication of the first book plus never-before-seen comics that have not appeared anywhere.  As with every Oatmeal collection, there is a pull-out poster at the back of the book.In this second collection of over 50 comics, you'll be treated to the hilarity of "The Crap We Put Up with Getting On and Off an Airplane," "Why Captain Higgins Is My Favorite Parasitic Flatworm," "This Is How I Feel about Buying Apps," "6 Things You Really Don't Need to Take a Photo of," and much more. Along with lambasting the latest culture crazes, Inman serves up recurrent themes such as foodstuffs, holidays, e-mail, as well as technological, news-of-the-day, and his snarky yet informative comics on grammar and usage. Online and in print, The Oatmeal delivers brilliant, irreverent comic hilarity.

Why Grizzly Bears Should Wear Underpants

$16.99

 He's the icon of millions of corporate workers, the most popular cubicle dweller on this planet. He spends his days in endless meetings with incompetent supervisors, performing perfunctory tasks mixed with the occasional team-building, brainstorming, or management fad-of-the-day session. He has entertained us for more than two decades: He's Dilbert. Does Dilbert creator Scott Adams have a hidden camera in your office--or is he just completely in tune with the inept managers, wacky office politics, and nonsensical leadership practices that seem to run wild at your company? Stop looking for the camera. Dilbert has become a hugely successful strip because Adams feels your pain. How? Because this former employee of a major telecommunications company has been there. He's seen the road to failure firsthand. And he knows that to successfully navigate the ludicrous world of business, you can't expect common sense to prevail, you need to keep a sense of humor, and above all, you must always be ready to blame the other guy. The strip's enormous popularity stems from the fact that its millions of readers easily identify with the crazy plots and wacky characters found within the corporate environment. Sure, most companies don't have a bespectacled engineer with a tie permanently curled up, a cynical talking dog, and a manager with two pointy tufts of hair. But it's the outrageous things Dilbert characters do and say that leave readers knowingly nodding their heads and, of course, laughing uproariously. The antics of Dilbert's cast are based not only on Adams's own corporate experiences, but on the numerous e-mails he receives each day about the office dramas of his devoted fans.

Go Add Value Someplace Else

$19.99

The magical friendship of Phoebe and her best friend, unicorn Marigold Heavenly Nostrils, is back in this second adventure of a girl and her mythical creature! One year has passed since Phoebe skipped a rock across a pond, accidentally hit a unicorn in the face, and was granted a single wish—which she used to make the unicorn, Marigold Heavenly Nostrils, her obligational best friend. In some ways, not much has changed. At school Phoebe still clashes with her rival--and sometimes “frenemy”--he ever-taunting and imperious Dakota. Outside of school, she still fills her free time with extra-credit homework assignments, dramatic monologues about the injustices associated with school cliques, and imaginative conspiracy theories regarding global forces like the “powerful construction paper lobby.” But unlike before, Phoebe now has a best friend to share it with—someone to make her laugh and to listen to all her extravagant ideas. In this second volume of Dana Simpson's Phoebe and Her Unicorn series, titled, Unicorn on a Roll, the reader is invited on a journey into the lives of Phoebe and Marigold as they navigate the difficulties of grade school, celebrate the winter holidays, and explore their super hero/super villain personas together. Join in the fun, as Phoebe competes against Dakota for the leading role of “Lisa Ladybug” in their fourth-grade play—or as she struggles to “manage” the PR debacle related to her nose-picking-scandal. (“I will neither confirm nor deny the events surrounding Boogergate.”) Witness a band of unicorns staging an “intervention” and learn all the details of Marigold’s secret crush on a mysterious creature she has never seen. Perhaps most important, watch as this surprising friendship between a charming, nine-year-old dreamer and a vain, mythical beast forever changes both of them for the better.

Unicorn on a Roll (Phoebe and Her Unicorn Series Book 2)

$9.99

What a long, strange strip it's been! Doonesbury has managed to be articulate, abrasive, political, compassionate, misunderstood, misprinted, and outrageous—but one thing it's never been is complacent. Garry Trudeau's creation has chronicled American history and culture in a parallel universe. And through it all, Doonesbury has always been honest, entertaining, and way, way cool.“I don’t read Doonesbury. He glorifies drugs.” —Former White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater   Welcome to the age of pivots. Two centuries after the Founding Fathers signed off on happiness, Zonker Harris and nephew Zipper pull up stakes and head west in hot pursuit. The dream? Setting up a major grow facility outside Boulder, Colorado, and becoming bajillionaire producers of “artisanal” marijuana. For Zonk, it’s the crowning reset of a career that’s ranged from babysitting to waiting tables. For Walden-grad Zip, it’s a way to confront $600,000 in student loans.   Elsewhere in Free Agent America, newlyweds Alex and Toggle are struggling. Twins Eli and Danny show up during their mother’s MIT graduation, but a bad economy dries up lab grants, compelling the newly minted PhD to seek employment as a barista. Meanwhile, eternally blocked writer Jeff Redfern struggles to keep the Red Rascal legend-in-his-own-mind franchise alive, while aging music icon Jimmy T. endures by adapting to his industry’s new normal: “I can make music on my schedule and release it directly to the fans.”   He’s living in his car.     G.B. Trudeau’s Doonesbury is now in its fifth decade, and has chronicled American life through eight presidents, four generational cohorts, and innumerable paradigm shifts. His political sitcom Alpha House, starring John Goodman, is available on DVD and by streaming from Amazon Prime.   For the record, Trudeau always inhaled back in the day. As President Obama once explained, “That was the point.”

The Weed Whisperer

$29.99